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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 10, 2016 3:00am-6:01am PST

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"morning joe" starts right now. >> sometimes, you know, we move in ways that some people think is forward and others think is moving back and that's okay. i've lost elections before. joe hasn't but, you know, so i've been -- i've been -- >> you beat me badly. >> that's the way politics works sometimes. we try really hard to persuade people that we're right. and then people vote and then if we lose, we learn from our mistakes, we do some reflection, we lick our wounds, we brush ourselves off. we get back in the arena. we go at it. we try even harder the next
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time. >> good morning. it's thursday, november 10th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, we have managing editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin. former democratic congressman harold ford jr. former treasury official and morning joe economic analyst steve rattner. veteran columnist mike barnicle and in washington white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. injure tweets throughout the election were priceless. >> mine? >> yes. they were funny. >> i didn't even know you followed me. thank you. >> we all follow you, sam. >> who doesn't follow sam stein? >> that makes me feel good. thank you. >> i'm glad we could make you feel good. tell your mother we follow you. the president, hillary clinton, very gracious yesterday. >> it was beautiful. it was really rough for everybody in the white house especially. been working for so many years on everything they've been building.
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it was a rough day and the president really, i think, pushed people forward in the right direction. and also pushed the president-elect in the right direction. >> i think as dramatic of a difference this certainly seems to the media, at least in new york and manhattan and d.c. and across the country, tre are so many similarities to what's happening today with what's happened when you have the passing the power in the past where you actually do see everybody going from showing their worst sides to their best sides. so you had those conversations, those speeches, and then you had donald trump calling chuck schumer. chuck schumer putting a good, positive statement out. nancy pelosi doing the same thing. them coming together as americans. i think there was a reason why the dow jones hit an all-time high yesterday. >> did you see that? >> it's because actually as much as we denigrate politicians in
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washington, yesterday democrats and republicans seemed to act together in concert in the best interest of this country. >> i thought the markets were supposed to collapse? >> we'll talk to steve rattner about that. let's get onto the news. >> president obama will be meeting with president-elect trump in the oval office later this morning to discuss the future of the country as well as potential policies that could be carried over. the president has ordered that trump, vice president-elect mike pence and designated members of their team receive access to the president's daily briefing. the intelligence assessment with the nation's most highly guarded secrets. first lady michelle obama will greet melania trump in the east residence for their first meeting as the white house changes hand and joe biden called governor pence yesterday and invited him to the naval observatory for dinner.
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how's that going to go? >> we had an abnormal presidential campaign and the last 48 hours is the way it always works. it's extraordinary. the meeting today president obama greeting the guy who was the leader of the birther movement and questioned his right to be president. >> donald trump saying these things about barack obama. barack obama spending the last month just hammering and savaging him saying he's unqualified to be president of the united states. i'm sure he said it because he believed it. but this reminds me so much, harold ford, of that book "the presidents club" that talks about michael duffy where you have people killing each other on the campaign and when it's over, they come together -- not happy about it -- but they come together and two years later they realize they're in a club
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and there's only like two or three people in the world who knows what they're going through and like george h.w. bush and bill clinton and like barack obama having very gracious things to say about george w. bush yesterday. they realize they're in this very small club and they lean on each other. >> part of what helps bind them in addition to what you and mark said and it's great for the country to see the tradition this part of the campaign and this part of the presidential transition happening as it should is they all get that presidential security briefing. when that happens not only are you a member of that club but you're the most important member of the club at the moment because you're expected to lead. so we'll watch this play out. it was fascinating on one level to talk to friends of mine who don't follow politics or know it and love it and live it like we do who were surprised that this could happen the way it is and that president obama and vice president biden would -- >> bill clinton, i think you've
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seen donald trump together, again, i had somebody shocked -- i said, bill clinton and donald trump will be playing golf within two years. they went -- it's going to happen. >> maybe the first year. >> because they have no choice. as barack obama said, this is an intermural battle. we're on the same team. we have to be in the same boat together. it's going to happen. >> just from pelosi to schumer across the board, and even this morning as you watch -- mika mentioned and steve will touch on how the markets reacted was a surprise for many people and even world leaders. i know when richard was on, he talked about his advice -- whom he would call and reassurances he would give and to see president-elect trump is doing that. demonstrations last night across the country but to watch this aspect of the transition happen
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is reassuring. >> steve, the markets, what happened? >> the markets went up for a variety of reasons. first of all, some of it is post-election relief that we had a peaceful transition of power. markets hate uncertainty and now you have certainty and good bit is look at what donald trump said he was going to do and what he's saying he's going to do is substantial tax cuts, which will in the short run create some economic growth and good bit of spending particularly on infrastructure and so if you look at the stocks and heavy equipment business like caterpillar and people that are involved in infrastructure, they went up a lot. banks went up a lot because interest rates went up which is good for banks but also because donald trump has said he's going to dismantle dodd/frank and that's something banking companies want. >> mike barnicle, if you just look at this ideologically out there, you're going to expect especially after such a heated campaign, you're going to expect that nothing gets done but the
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fact is nancy pelosi immediately said along with chuck schumer and others, i think we can work on an infrastructure bill together. donald trump also talking about infrastructure. and nancy pelosi said as president-elect trump indicated, investing in infrastructure is important priority of his. i had somebody say so now the republicans want to do infrastructure because now there's a republican that's president. that's somebody that just doesn't understand. donald trump has been a democrat his entire life. donald trump is not going to fight for the things that i fought for, which is entitlement reform, balance budget. he wants to be a big president. >> maybe some of them. >> he wants to be a big president. he's not going sit there looking at decimal points and how the budget is going to balance 25 years from now. there are going to be a lot of things where he and pelosi will
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have more in common than say he and pat toomey. >> first of all, joe, the country was owed what happened yesterday. this peaceful transition. the acknowledgements from president obama, speaker pelosi, donald trump in the early morning hours yesterday speaking more humanely and more soberly about the job that he is about to takeover. i don't think in history we could look at history and never see a time when a peaceful transition was more necessary and needed to be spoken about publicly by the people involved in it. with regard to his potential program, with regard to cutting regulations and steve just alluded to the stock market having a fairly healthy day, a very healthy day, i can't recall -- we always talk about the first 100 days of an administration. i can't recall a time in the last 40 to 50 years of presidencies when the first 100
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days is going to be more instrumental in setting a course for a presidency than donald trump's first 100 days because he has, first of all, for the first time in history he has mitch mcconnell actually smiling and meaning it. he has the republicans in control of the house and the republicans in control of the white house. >> you also have, mike, something -- i know this will be a shock to editors at "the new york times," but it shouldn't be, you'll have donald trump, a republican president, talking to a minority leader in chuck schumer and a democratic minority leader nancy pelosi, who understand each other culturally. i know that will shock a lot of people. they have been around each other for years. donald trump has, i think, given checks to both of them. >> has that ever happened the president has given to minority leaders? >> a democrat their entire life and decides three years before
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he runs for president to be a republican. what i noticed is there's a cultural divide between, let's say, democrats from new york and california and republicans negotiating from middle america. you're just not going to have that this time. you're actually, again, i know a lot of ideologues don't want to hear this and it will upset a lot of conservative republicans and liberal democrats, but you're going to have -- it wasn't hard for donald trump to call chuck schumer yesterday or nancy pelosi. he's known them a long time. contributed to them and maybe washington will work more effectively. >> i'm going to say this and it may be too soon because i've never seen these two americas as you walk around this world, everybody is crying. so upset. it is the end of their world. i've never seen this more than in this past election result.
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having said that, we do know donald trump. what he does love is interacting friction with drama with engaging with joy with people. he's not afraid of people. he wants to talk to people all day long. it's what he does. this is going to be unlike anything we've ever seen, and i think decades and definitely in the past administration where i feel that there was a lack of interest in socializing and connecting with people after hours. i think that president obama had a different approach that way. and hillary clinton had a big wall of protection around her. there was no access to her. i think this is going to be politically the most assessable president we've ever seen. >> i think also anybody that knows how george w. bush ran his administration, he had republicans two years in complaining that they never had been to the white house to meet him before. >> you're not going to have that problem here. >> george w. bush the same way. he wanted to work. he wanted to go upstairs and watch espn.
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this will be far different. we have a lot to talk about. in "the new york times" there's a piece where the media is examining how horrifically they missed this and what a bubble they were in. i want to talk about that. it leads into a lot of things that you're saying. first, i think we just have to get to the most moving sound from yesterday. hillary clinton's remarkable speech. >> here she is speaking to her supporters and tearful aides about the loss. >> last night i congratulated donald trump and offered to work with him on behalf of our country. i hope that he will be a successful president for all americans. this is not the outcome we wanted or we worked so hard for, and i'm sorry that we did not win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country. i know how disappointed you feel
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because i feel it too. and so do tens of millions of americans who invested their hopes and dreams in this effort. this is painful. and it will be for a long time. we have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought. but i still believe in america, and i always will. and if you do then we must accept this result and then look to the future. donald trump is going to be our president. we owe him an open mind and the chance to lead. our constitutional democracy enshrines the peaceful transfer the power, and we don't just respect that, we cherish it. it also enshrines other things. the rule of law, the principle that we are all equal in rights and dignity, freedom of worship
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and expression, we respect and cherish these values too, and we must defend them. and to the young people in particular, i hope you will hear this. i've had successes, and i've had setbacks. this loss hurts. but please never stop believing that fighting for what's right is worth it. [ applause ] and to all the women, i want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion. and to all of the little girls who are watching this, never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams. >> mika, in a day of
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extraordinary moments, i got to say, moments that moved me and surprised me more than any in at least a decade. i can't think of a day where i just kept looking at the television saying i can't believe this story unfolded the way it did. i can't think of another news story that surprised me this much politically in a very long time. >> i think they're surprised too. the entire campaign -- >> that was the most remarkable moment of all of the remarkable moments we saw yesterday. hillary clinton once again doing what she does best coming back and showing unprecedented perseverance. >> it was beautiful. steve rattner? >> i've known her for 20 years as i suspect other people at this table have. she is a formidable woman. she's of extraordinary ambition. i say that in a positive way. that makes this kind of a moment even harder to take. it was so unexpected.
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i've been around her supporters the last 48 hours and devastation is palpable. it's one thing to lose. it's another thing to until 9:00 at night think you're going to win. and this is an example of her incredible self-discipline and incredible commitment to public service and her incredible desire to end this on a high note. >> harold ford, we have come to expect people like hillary clinton and al gore and george h.w. bush to show extraordinary grace in defeat. there's no guarantee that that's going to happen. what hillary clinton did yesterday, i put up there with the other two people i named. again, just an extraordinary selflessness putting country ahead of party and ahead of personal ambition.
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it was really moving and extraordinary what she did. >> astonishing resilience she showed yesterday. as both of you have said 12 hours, 18 hours before, she thought this would be a very different outcome. especially 24 hours before. and to take on all of the pain and the grief to steve's point the unbelievable feeling in that room. she took it all on and projected back to everyone if you believe in what we fought for and what i fought for throughout my public life, now is not the time to give up. to hold herself together with her husband, her daughter, her son-in-law standing there, vice presidential candidate, and all of us watching, many of us who invested so much in her personally and to the campaign, it was really a stunning moment. i congratulate her and thank her for the service for 40 years in public life and hope it's not the end of it. it's a different chapter and different way she can contribute. it was really remarkable. >> we're going to talk about this more in the next few blocks, i want to follow-up on
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what steve just said about how the clinton campaign believed until 9:00 that they had a lock on this. that they were going to win. the fault of that actually lies with the media. and there's some self-reflection. jim writes a fascinating article where "the new york times" editor and others basically come to terms with the fact that they stopped being journalists over the last month and began being cheerleaders and began being people who had a conclusion that they reached and then searched for facts to show that hillary clinton was a 92, 93, 99.99% chance winner of winning this campaign. they -- >> how else would you explain it? is it a big aberration? i would like to hear --
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>> it was there the entire time. they didn't want to hear it. they didn't want to see it. when people like mark, us, nate silver, even -- i want you guys to think about this. people i know and love, i want you to think about this. when anybody even made the suggestion that donald trump could be elected president of the united states, it was their journalistic standards that were questioned. when mark halperin suggested that there was a pathway forward for donald trump as president of the united states, i won't name names because so many of them are my friends and there's no need to name names now. the time for recrimination is over. but reporters at some of the best newspapers in the world, anchors at some of the best news networks in the world, mocked
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and ridiculed -- mark halperin, think about this. they mocked and ridiculed him not for saying that donald trump is going to be elected president of the united states. they mocked and ridiculed him for saying there was a slight chance that donald trump could be elected president of the united states. now, if your job, you thought, and jim did say back in august "the new york times" job and journalist job was to defeat donald trump, that was editor of "the new york times" confirmed that, if you really think that's your job -- think about what you did. you were trying to help hillary clinton defeat donald trump because you thought donald trump would be such a malignant cancer on our constitutional republic but you did two things. the first thing you did is you put liberals and democrats and
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independents who thought like you, you put them in a position where they were complacent and really did believe not only in new york but across america and the world that hillary clinton had a 98.99 chance of being elected president of the united states. so if that's the case, why do i have to go to the phone banks? why do i have to knock on doors? why do i have to go out of my house at 7:00 at night and get in my car and drive two blocks over and talk to a friend who is wai wavering and explain to them why hillary clinton would be best. >> why do i have to vote? >> you told me she has a 99.9% chance of winning or 90% chance of winning if year talking about the upshot. poor nate silver got slammed for saying she had a 70% chance of winning. that's the first thing you did. the second thing you did, which i think you're beginning to understand now from reading the really good penetrating article,
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is you completely ignored the world. the elite cluster. that you don't know. a complete blind spot. it was much easier for you to stay in manhattan and say they're voting for trump because they're racists and bigots. if you really do believe that, you believe that 50 million people are racists and bigots and if you really do believe that, i take pity on you. you didn't don't understand what michael moore understands. america is hurting. economically middle america is hurting. you don't understand what's going on. i don't understand what's going on out there.
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you know what mark and i did that you didn't do? you know what mika did that you didn't do? we actually talked to people in middle america. they told us why they were hurting and why they were voting for donald trump. you were with donald trump's campaign the last 96 hours. you saw crowds and michigan in these other states. minnesota crowds that you've never seen before. >> sunday we're going to have the tour we covered donald trump for the last three days and talked to a lot of voters. you hear those voices as we heard all year when we traveled and talked to people supporting trump, you said a lot of things i want to respond to. i love "the new york times." it's a great institution. >> i need to say this. point of personal privilege. i love "the new york times." i read it every day. i've said this time and time again. i have the greatest respect for the reporters over there.
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i don't know what i would do without "the new york times." it's how i gauge -- >> look at the headline of this story. look at the headline of this story. this is the day after a surprising underdog sweeping victory and their headline is not disaffected americans have a champion going to the white house or the country votes for fundamental change. the headline is about how disappointed the friends of "the new york times" are about what's happened. it's amazing. it's amazing to me that this is thheadline of "the new york times" and not picking on the "times" but it's a great example. >> look at this. this is staggering. i'm glad you brought this up. >> it's "the onion." >> they don't get it. >> this is about them. >> this is a "saturday night live" skit. you went to a cocktail party the night before and decided to write this.
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>> when i thought trump had a chance to lose, which i did. i thought he had a chance to win it. i said to liberals, he's going to get 42 million votes. 42 million people are going to vote for him. what are they voting for? this is their headline. if a democratic candidate who had a 10% of winning by "the new york times" had ended up winning and winning red states as trump won blue states, i don't think that would have been the headline. i'll say again the responsibility of journalists is to not report on their biases. it's to go out and understand the country through the prism of the election and say why are people feeling the way they're feeling? i am just stunned at how people are reacting. except i'm not stunned. >> "the boston globe." they did it right. seismic shift. we're all saying we thought trump could have won. we're just as shocked as you are
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that he won the way he did. so nobody is sitting here saying we had a crystal ball. but the thing is understand across divide, "the washington post" writes all eyes on trump. >> can i say one more thing. >> "the wall street journal" had probably the best headline. "a new political order." that we all have to grapple with. i'm going to depend on "the new york times" and their great journalists to help us through this time but they have got to keep the editorial mumbo jumbo on the editorial page. >> her performance was so moving to see how upset her supporters were. i understand why they're upset. tons of friends that supported hillary clinton. i understand why they are hurt. >> i had friends that cried all day yesterday. they're close friends. i understand what it means when
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people that you believe in lose. i've got to tell you, i never had the media focus on my people when the people that i supported, sometimes democrats, conservative democrats, lost. there's an outpouring of grief. >> if donald trump had lost, do you think the press would have been so concerned about his supporters and their disappointment? the country is divided. she won the popular vote. a lot of people are upset about this. the coverage cannot just be and dialogue cannot just be about how upset those people are. i feel so bad for them. people that are hugging each other and crying. heartbreaking. and for her who as we said before, she thought at 9:00 p.m. she was going to be president. she thought for weeks she was going to be president. >> the whole world did because the media didn't do their job for the past month. let's just say it. >> you want michael moore? >> liberal filmmaker michael moore responded to donald trump's election yesterday with a morning after to do list
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posted on facebook. besides taking over the democratic party and returning it to the people, he advocates to "fire all pundits, predictors, pollsters and anyone else in the media who had a narrative they wouldn't let go of and refused to listen to or acknowledge what was really going on. they will now tell us we need to heal and divide and come together. they will pull more hooey like that in the days to come. turn them off." he adds, "you were in a bubble and not paying attention to your fellow americans and their despair. years of being neglected by both parties the need for anger and revenge against the system only grew. along came a tv star they liked whose plan was to destroy both parties and tell them all you're fired. trump's victory is no surprise. he was never a joke. treating him as one only strengthened him."
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>> which we said on this program, which i know a lot of people at these newspapers watch, in june of 2015, almost verbatim we said the more you mocked him, the stronger you make him. >> when he came down the escalator, we said this could happen. and the entire room laughed. >> michael moore predicted that donald trump was going to win. michael moore did one of the most extraordinary things. this shows how there's new political order. michael moore is somebody that -- we've been at each other's throats for a decade. but michael moore got it better than anybody else this entire campaign and he did something extraordinary. he did something that we all need to do as americans that live more and more in our clusters. we live around people who think like us, who vote like us, who worship like us or don't worship at all, but michael moore --
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actually is michael moore talking to donald trump supporters and having a conversation with them and understanding them and explaining why they shouldn't vote for donald trump. it was an extraordinary exercise. if the media had done it, hillary clinton may have won. >> all right. still ahead on "morning joe," graciousness between politicians but protests did break out in the streets all over the country last night. we'll have more on the complicated aftermath of this election. and later, history in the making. we'll get perspective of bob woodward, walter isaacson and historian doris kearns good goo. we'll be right back.
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i'm also aware those are emotions that trump supporters felt, emotions that led them to make their choice and it would be wrong for me to think my emotions are somehow more authentic their than emotions. we're always better as a society when we have empathy for one another so i would just say -- i would like to say to trump voters. congratulations. i sincerely hope he addresses your concerns. i sincerely hope that if you felt forgotten, he won't forget you now. >> there's a guy who is a good democrat from new hampshire. he believes it. that's what america needs to do. there are some late-night hosts that lost it. never once in our house in mississippi when i was in third grade did i think johnny carson was mocking me or my family or
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ridiculing the way we lived. it just seeps out of the pores of some of these people. it didn't with seth myers and he was raised right to believe that other people who don't think just like him actually have as valuable feelings as they do. we were talking about -- we're going to talk about how the clinton campaign and how the media is in a bubble. this actually is not just a democratic phenomenon. four years ago we were going after mitt romney and his team for being in a bubble and only going on fox and only watching fox. say what you will about the trump people, they watch everything. romney people would only watch fox news. they got in a bubble. mark halperin, 12:00 at night romneys were trying to figure out how they weren't ahead. they were in the bubble that the clinton people put themselves in. >> we've not heard from joel
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benenson yet as far as i know -- >> what about people that told them like rahm emanuel, you may not win this thing. >> they were not interested you may not win. we talked about it all the time. the lack of message is something, reporting today that bill clinton was concerned about that, too. they weren't interested in hearing about that. they were interested in hearing about how to take down donald trump. >> harold, like i said, in july, you told people to gasps at my son's wedding that donald trump was going to win. everybody was shocked and stunned. they didn't want to hear it. >> he had a rationale and i think that part of what mark is getting at and having said on th his show and your show, i understand you wanted to take trump down but the central element had to be the reason you don't want him is because i'm going to do this. i think secretary clinton had in
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her head what she wanted to do but at times it did not come out. that rationale was not the centerpiece and nucleus of the public communication from the campaign. >> michael steele, republicans have done this for years. you listen to talk radio. they go to conservative blogs. talking about candidates. they watch fox news. they never get out of their bubble and wonder why we lost five out of the last six elections in the popular vote. you have to get out of your bubble and if you're a republican, you have to understand how people are thinking in manhattan. if you're in manhattan, you have to figure out how people are thinking in manhattan, kansas. >> for a long time the party, particularly the leadership, sat in a room preparing to go out into the world and tell the world what we're going to do not recognizing that the world has moved past them and to a whole other landscape. in many respects was playing catchup. along comes donald trump. he bursts that bubble.
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and he brings a new reality for them to have to deal with. democrats struggled with it during this election cycle. republicans struggled with it during the election cycle. the media and others who kind of looked at donald trump. i just remember "the huffington post" decision. we'll put him on the entertainment page. rest of america said you do that. >> they put him on the entertainment page. it's not sam's responsibility but we'll go to sam and blame him. it's like the "saturday night live" hillary clinton and kate mckinnon when they were the two hillaries and they ended a scene laughing hiat prospect of donal trump being in the white house. i remember watching that getting a chill. >> i remember mika saying they don't want him. sam stein, you know the people that understood this also early on when the democratic establishment didn't, all of
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obama's people. david axelrod. david saying that he would do better in the industrial midwest than other republicans. >> am i supposed to address that or michael steele's dig at my -- >> it was a great example. >> why don't we just say we all love "the huffington post" and impart some of your wisdom on us in 140 characters or less. go. >> first things first, i do want to address actually what michael was saying because i think it is important. i think it does get to discussion about the media and role it played here. you know, there were very tough
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editorial choices about what trump was and what he meant. as i said before on this program, one thing we grappled with is here was a person who was from the world of entertainment. what did it mean when he came into power and how do you cover him editorially. we missed it. >> everybody missed it. >> when it became something that was a darker phenomenon for people, not for everyone, when he talked about banning muslims, suddenly we needed to readjust. i'm glad that we did. so that's just to address what michael was talking about. i don't think we're unique in trying to or grappling with the idea of this phenomenon. what you said about how some people in the democratic party were aware of what was happening and warning about it, that's 150% true.
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you know, the premise of bernie sanders' campaign was that the party had become too elite heavy and that you had to know what was going on that there was a populist streak going on and now the question for democrats is this. can you reconstitute the obama coalition without obama and what does it mean to operate in a post-obama world and can you be a party that goes and builds a coalition based on emerging minority groups like hispanics or do you have to readjust? the last thing i'll say -- >> can i stop you right there. that's a very important point, sam. we heard a lot of commentators come on yesterday that were not as measured saying that trump won because america was bigoted. it was a white man's last stand. i think actually it may have been the upshot that said -- let me finish. said it's very important to
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understand that saying it was about race misses the entire point. that actually donald trump won because he performed well in areas that barack obama performed well in. so you can't say oh america is so enlightened eight years ago when the same people that elected a black man eight years later are electing a white man that is deeply offensive to millions of people. >> so here's my theory of this. i agree 100% with that. you clearly had a phenomenon of people saying enough of this. i'm backing trump. i think what happened was, one, they felt like policies in washington had left them behind clearly. two, there was a thing a phenomenon of moral licensing in which they thought to themselves, i have voted for a black man. i've proved that i'm not racist. i know i'm not racist. i can tolerate some of donald
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trump's rough edges. >> but, sam, voters -- take this from a guy. miael, let me go to you and harold, let me go to you. take this one guy that understands why people vote for you. they do not think philosophically going into the booth eight years ago i voted for a black man so now i can vote for a bigot. all they think about is what is in my family's best interest? how do i pay for my car? i get 36 more months and it's not a fix the rate so i could get screwed if the economy goes haywire. how do i pay my rent? how do i get my kid going to a community college. i want him to go to the state school. that's how they think about. they did not vote for barack obama to make a statement in pennsylvania. they voted for barack obama because they believe he would ease their pain. he would get them health care. they voted for donald trump not because they thought he was a
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racist, they voted for donald trump because they thought that their health care premiums were going too high. he was an aspirational guy. all of these people and newspapers, they're not trying to make a statement. they're trying to survive, michael. they're trying to survive. >> which is why the party leadership was in such a pickle and that's why you and mika and i were kind of going back and forth on this whole thing and why it was hard for the leadership to move off of that point because they understood fundamentally what you just said. they are elected officials. they know what their voters do and think and feel when they go in that voting booth. >> they needed to get onboard and say it like that because that middle was rough. >> the obama coalition is like any coalition that has won in
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the past. sanders succeeded in the democratic primary because of what you said. he pushed an economic message that democrats could understand. bill clinton succeeded in '92 because he talked about what james carville said. it's the economy, stupid. we did not succeed this time largely because we didn't have a central economic message. for democrats to think there was something magical about the words obama coalition, you're kidding yourself. the obama coalition formed because he talked about change. he talked about ways to transform our foreign policy and economic policy in this country to benefit middle class americans. unfortunately at this moment -- >> stop spending money on war. spend it on my family. >> we didn't have that hook this time. that's what the obama coalition is about. people also talk about what he got there and people were racist. barack obama won two times. certainly there's an element of people in this country who are racist but that's not the predominant part. are donald trump supporters openly racist?
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sure. the message is broader than that. the right message is not a group of racists are supporting. the right message is we need a better economic message going forward. >> data they ignored it all along. the very people that helped elect barack obama in 2008 and 2012 elected donald trump in 2016. i've always said the same people that voted for ronald reagan twice voted for bill clinton twice, voted for george w. bush twice. >> and then voted for barack obama. >> and voted for barack obama twice. >> you mention bernie sanders. a real candidate with a real message pushed out by a rigged system. that's what was revealed along the way. >> the former majority leader lost a primary that had him polling ahead. >> we'll talk to him and former senator tom coburn about what could be a contentious relationship between donald trump and congressional republicans when they get down to business. we'll be right back. d.
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coming up at the top of the hour -- >> mike barnicle said we missed a key point. >> we covered it just fine, mike. my god. the transition of power to donald trump is now under way. presidential historian doris kearns goodwin joins us to talk about the magnitude of the moment that most political observers never saw coming. plus -- >> right now in every major poll, national poll and statewide poll done in the last month, six weeks, we are defeating trump often by big numbers and always in larger margin than sretary clinton is. >> thursday morning quarterbacking. could bernie sanders have beaten donald trump? i always thought that was a possibility. i did. some people suggested it. >> you said beforehand it was a better matchup for democrats than donald trump against the clinton machine just like donald trump against the bush machine. bernie sanders was a wild card
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that would have taken his votes. i doubt you would have had him winning in michigan and wisconsin. >> "morning joe" is back in a moment. says it won't let up for a while. the cadillac xt5... what should we do? ...tailored to you. wait it out. equipped with apple carplay compatibility. ♪ now during season's best, get this low mileage lease on this cadillac xt5 from around $429 per month, or purchase with 0% apr financing. could be you've got the wrong bed. enter sleep number... she likes the bed soft. he's more hardcore. you can both adjust the bed for the best sleep of your life. right now, save $500 on the queen cse mattress. plus 36 month special financing. know better sleep with sleep number.
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or any symptoms of an allergic reactn, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis and a $200 savings card. >> i've said before, i think of this job as being a relay runner. you take the baton. you run your best race and hopefully by the time you hand it off, you're a little further ahead. you made a little progress. i can say that we've done that.
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i want to make sure that handoff is well executed because ultimately we're all on the same team. >> election is over. it's been decided. the american people have decided. president obama didn't get to choose his successor. the american people do that. they've chosen somebody that president obama disagrees with on a wide range of issues and those disagreements in most cases aren't just minor disagreements but profound disagreements. >> that's one way to look at it. welcome back to "morning joe." it's thursday, november 10th. mike barnicle, sam stein, michael steele still with us. joining us walter isaacson and doris kearns goodwin and bob woodward. good to have you all onboard. >> doris, obviously you spent an awful lot of time and identified with the presidency of lbj.
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that's a great place to start when looking at how we have presidencies move from one person to another person despite the fact they may be contemptuous of each other. lbj didn't have a lot of use for richard nixon and yet -- is that an understatement? >> a clear statement. >> ike was contemptuous of jfk. couldn't believe that a kid like jfk would sit in his chair in the oval office and yet there's some magic every four years. yesterday barack obama provided that for us. >> i think all three of them did in a certain sense have a classiness and concession and looking forward and congratulations. the election it most reminds me of is 1948. think about it. truman is on that train.
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everybody says dewey is going to win. it's not only the next morning he holds up a sign saying dewey wins. "life" magazine had to recreate its whole issue based on dewey's cabinet. the reporters were all on the train. 50 reporters. they all took a poll who is going to win. to a person they said it would be dewey. james reston wrote an apology for "the new york times." he said we didn't look at intangibles. we saw intensity of support truman had. people were coming up to him on the train but the polls said he was going to lose. so we listened to the polls. >> what a parallel. >> the more things change, the more they stay the same. today "the new york times" writes a story where the mea culpa cul culpaed cul culpas are coming fast and furious. we must go out and listen to people. >> in 1980 covering the campaign
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in new hampshire and iowa, mike barnicle was there. tommy for "the boston globe" but also bob healey would say let's go door knocking. come with us. we're going to knock on doors. you would fan out into neighborhoods and you would say, hey, tell me what you think about this election. you would listen for a long time. then people said you don't need to do that. we have polls. people quit door knocking and quit listening. i remember this time around, my wife and i were driving through central pennsylvania, upstate new york, trump sign, trump sign, trump sign. and i talked to this guy who is a novel. he said i was driving earlier this year. all you said is trump signs. you would say that to some reporters now and they would say we're looking at the twitter trending and doing facebook live.
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i think one of the things it taught us is that a pretty small thing is that maybe nowadays we ought to listen to voters more and knock on doors a little bit more and count trump signs or count yard signs more. >> we were going to an event in central connecticut. we heard all of the reports. trump campaign is disorganized. they can't even get yard signs out. >> people were running us over every day. >> we saw one after another after another handmade sign. >> that's the key. >> trump/pence. >> one painted a huge trump/pence sign. we're not passing any judgment on trump or clinton. we're just saying if you're going to make your own handmade signs or if you're driving across america and all you see are trump signs --
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>> count the yard signs. listen to the voters. knock on doors. >> "the new york times" public editor writes this. "want to know what america is thinking? try asking. on tuesday afternoon "the new york times" told readers upshot polling featured that hillary clinton had an 84% chance of winning. sometime tuesday night that 84% clinton win upshot figure flipped. suddenly it was 95%, for donald trump. and when readers woke up on wednesday they learned that the second forecast at least was on target. readers are sending letters of complaint at a rapid rate. certainly the "times" isn't the only news organization bewildered and perhaps a bit sheepish about its coverage. the rest of the media missed it as did pollsters, analysts, democratic party and clinton campaign itself. as the "times" begins a period of self-reflection, i hope editors will think hard about the half of america the paper
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too seldom covers." >> we said it here in real time. you know it's a terrible sign when "the new york times," which is the paper of record for so many people, certainly for me, when "the new york times" has its best, brightest young journalists go on twitter and 10 times, 15 times a day tweet out contemptuous tweets about donald trump from some of these great writers who i believe will one day run "the new york times." think about that. you actually have a leadership at the "the new york times" this campaign. i think it will change. that actually encouraged their journalists to aggressively take a stand against a major party candidate and then wonder why they so misrepresented reality to their readers and so let their readers down. >> the thinning out of the print
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newspaper business in this country is part of the story but it's a separate story. the need for younger reporters or reporters of any age actually to feed this online beast three or four or five times a day has a draining effect on a lot of reporters. it doesn't give you the time to think about what you're writing or seeing. i would say to boil it down what has happened here and you can see this coming, you could really see this coming, too many people in my business, our business, walter, they missed the one real draw that brings a lot of people to the polls. it's emotional. the ability for people to feel something about their candidate and to think that they can access their candidate emotionally. >> we were told four years ago that you could look at polls and say that barack obama had a
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78.49368% chance of winning. i will tell you when mark halperin and i four years ago mocked that idea, we were universally -- andrew sullivan wrote the nastiest column about me for not bowing at the feet of nate silver, who this year, ironically, gets secured for saying trump had a one in three chance. >> bob woodward, mike barnicle mentioned thinning out of newspapers. i would like to flip that thought. you talked about reporters tweeting negative things about trump and getting in on the conversation and twitter and other social mediums in some ways it seems like social media -- i would say twitter is great example of this -- almost dumbs down that second and third look you need to give something.
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there may be a need for papers again where it actually takes time to write a story and that friction of a debate like this happening before that story gets posted because that seemed a little lost along the way. >> the problem is, bob, if there were one reporter at "the new york times" that went in three weeks beforehand and said i think trump is going to win, they would have been run out of the newsroom. i can tell you because of the ridicule that i took. i really don't have to answer to anybody. i do this show. i work on my floor alone. and then i go home to my kids. i don't care what anybody else says. i answer to no one except andy and phil and they say say what you think. but if i'm a 25-year-old "the new york times" or "the washington post" reporter and i have a hunch because i talked to my family members in amarillo, texas, this may not turn out the way my editors think, there was such a group think this time, bob, i don't think that would
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have been possible for a young reporter to stand up to an entire newsroom. >> i think it would be possible, but it's all about method and internet keeps reporters in the office because you're right. they have to do something four or five times a day. people do not get out. there's a kind of impatience in speed culture and it was david -- some of you remember the great reporter at the "post" who always insisted we are going to knock on doors. we're going to new hampshire. we're going to iowa. we're not just going to spend an afternoon doing it. we're going to spend days doing it. and so whether the answer was there or not it is a method that should be employed. also, look, let's be very direct and honest about this.
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there are so many people in the news business who were so against trump, so convinced that he would bring the apocalypse and it would be the end, name names, david at "the new yorker" wrote after the election the result is sickening. does that mean he disagrees, yes, but it also shows he feels that all of these people who voted for trump created this condition of sickness, and i don't think that's the right approach. >> it was a cycle, which started with editors and i saw this in realtime on our show. people storming off the set. editors saying he could never -- what a joke. what a joke. this is when he announced. he's a joke. it will never happen. he's a joke. it will never happen and then morphing into he doesn't actually have the result they expect and he starts to say
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crazy things and now they're angry. they're angry that they were wrong. >> then morphing into he's a nazi. he's a fascist. let me tell you real quickly and then go to doris, let me tell what you nazis and fascists don't do. they don't call nancy pelosi and say, hey, i want to work with you. how do we work together? nazis and fascists do not call chuck schumer and say i know you're the minority leader and one of the most powerful people in washington. we need to work together. that's the thing. you can be offended by all of the things that he says, i totally understand that. we were offended by the muslim ban, by david duke, by all of it. we were offended by it. but we have a responsibility to tell people what's going to happen. and not to be lazy and say he's a nazi or a fascist. >> how do you put this into historical perspective, doris? reporters watching tweets from their colleagues coming in as they're working on their pieces.
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i don't know. it became this big circle of -- >> it's a group think. >> i think before we figure out that the press all thought he was going to lose at the end, at the beginning the press gave him his platform. we got to remember that. he could call shows. his little picture could be there. he could be in the news every single day in a way an ordinary candidate would have had hard time doing that. >> do you think the press did that or platform he built for himself did that and other candidates didn't want to speak out the same way? >> i think it's a combination. i think it's a combination. >> we asked every candidate if they wanted to call in, they could call in. nobody called in. we asked jeb to call us. we asked kasich. nobody called. >> the one thing that you said that i agree with, what trump provided was an appeal to the emotions of the people. he told a story. right. he had a story understandable. i'm going to make america great again. people feel that the country has passed them by. people feel they want something different. everything else on the other
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side where it's a series of programs that might have helped people in lots of ways. it didn't connect emotionally. >> i'm going to tell you a story. the two of you were there. it was a cold, snowy, icy night in manchester, new hampshire, at the verizon center. there was a trump rally. the place was full to capacity. the fire marshals -- >> despite the fact there was a snowstorm. >> fire marshals were letting people crowd in. trump was late because of the conditions outside. he arrives. spectacular rally. music. people applauding. looking up adoringly. >> that's the night he said something very foul. >> what you have to grasp about the emotional aspect of campaigns and elections, those people had come to see donald trump but they were going to also vote for him. >> we thought we needed a ground game to get them out. >> no undecides there. >> what i keep remembering the most surprising vote to me was 1916 when charles evans hughes was way ahead.
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>> i was there. >> remember that day. >> cold in new hampshire back then. >> everyone said he won. in the middle of the night it changes to woodrow wilson. the reporter goes to the hotel and this aide comes to the door and says the president-elect has gone to sleep. the reporter says tell the president-elect when he wakes in the morning he's no longer the president-elect. >> wow. >> james carville actually said it's so interesting a lot of these people that have done it before like axelrod and carville the first democrats to pick up on this. i remember when carville said he and his wife were driving from new orleans across mississippi and they went past mississippi gulf coast coliseum and james carville said there were people at 9:00 in the morning lined up around the mississippi gulf coast coliseum. guess what? every one of those people are going vote. you don't stand in line for 12
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hours to hear a speech and then not stand in line for two hours and vote for somebody. >> here's one of the things that got missed because we talk about you door knocking and stuff, it's not just the coverage of trump, but it's the coverage of america that got a little bit missed. dean, who i really like, i think he's a good editor, he said this morning or yesterday there are a lot of people we just weren't listening to who were left behind and disenfranchised by globalization, immigration, trade, everything else, that was a big mood in america. this wasn't a little election about small things. this was about a major mood in america of people really upset that they had been left behind and that was something the antenna of the coastal press corps didn't pick up. >> the question, bob woodward, how could an editor of a
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newspaper like "the new york times" agree with jim rutenberg's column in august that said it's okay to take an adversarial position to stop being journalists and take an adversarial position against one of the two candidates. which he confirmed when you do that, how do you see the unexpected? >> it's clearly a mistake to do that. i think dean is a terrific editor. and if you can step back from the emotions of this aftermath discussion, "the new york times," my newspaper, "the washington post," lots of publications did very serious reporting on trump on hillary clinton and if you wanted to find out who these people were, it was in the paper. and that is the key issue to the voter and so it was available. that doesn't mean this was a
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success. it means that we've got to -- i mean, i had one editor tell me very early when i was working on a story said get your ass out of the chair and go there. it's simple. i suspect lots of people are going to be going there. >> mike, it's almost as if people have forgotten the fundamentals. >> leave the building. >> it's blocking and tackling of journalists. i don't know. you know. >> stop using google establish eye contact with an actual human being. >> sam stein, as long as we're doing media autopsy this morning, let me ask you a question. >> sure. >> in terms of people -- we know -- i respect almost everybody in the business today. no matter their age, i think they bring their best to the thing every day. but there is an element of elitism that i think has been within the news business for
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quite sometime. it is this. the question to you, sam, why is it you think that people in our business, people who work in new york or washington, boston, l.a., whatever, they seem not to understand that someone who works in the middle of indiana has the same hopes and dreams and aspirations for their country and their children as we do? why is that? >> i don't think they -- i mean, i can't speak for the entire news business. i don't think they don't understand that. i think that what we've talked about is that they need to go out and myself included, i mean, i'm way to into d.c. and i need to get out there more. that's a point of self-reflection. i failed in my job the last year and a half. >> what happened when you went to a trump rally a couple weeks ago? when you went to a trump rally a couple weeks ago, you came on the show the next day. somebody suggested trump people were racist. you said they're not racist. i was there. i went to the trump rally. they're not racists.
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>> i mean, that's my part of my self-reflection is i wish i had done that more. and i'll just say this. if you can afford me this minute. i think it's important to know two things. one, there is another side to this coin. the empathy that reporters and people on tv need to feel toward the trump voters to understand their plight, when the next, you know, year and a half come about and there are attempts to take away people's health insurance or to uproot immigrant communits or to potentially go into mosques and surveil them, i hope we show the same empathy for the people on the tail end of those policies as well and that we go out and we see the exact implications of an agenda. >> we got that covered. sam, we got that more than covered. by the way, i'll let you get to the second thing. first, do not misunderstand what i am saying. i'm not talking about empathy. i'm not talking about emotion.
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i'm talking about understanding. >> that's my fault. >> i'm talking about understanding what they're doing. i can understand how somebody feels without being sympathetic to their point of view. >> sure. the other thing is sort of a larger picture about the politics here which is that if you step back and you look at the votes, this was obviously a missed phenomenon in terms of trump support especially in the rust belts but if you look at what happened here it appears is trump did what mitt romney did in terms of total votes but he got them in critical states. the story seems to me at this juncture -- one, why this was missed and where the trump vote came from but why democrats didn't come out for hillary clinton? she lost compared to the obama levels. he about stabilized at the romney levels. there's two stories here we need to digest. >> in terms of the media, i mean, there's another trend that played into this problem instead
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of everyone just being wrong and dumping on everybody. major networks and news organizations have been going on the cheap for two decades now. they've been cutting back bureaus around the world, around the country. tell me a reporter for a major network that lives in trump country that really knows how people feel and think out there and can really write. i know from working at a major network myself and working for an evening newscast, several of them, when i was sent out to get moss, man on the street interview, i was sent out to sixth avenue because we had to get it done quickly. how does that give you gauge of how people are feeling? >> when you say trump country, let's figure this out. >> america. >> let's figure this out. you would have to drive from the new jersey border straight west and would you have to go all of the way -- if i'm not mistaken, if you went on a straight line from jersey, all of the way to oregon to get out of trump
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country. >> you want to go to trump country, do you think we're isolated on the coast? by the way, i want to say to michael steele real quickly, i don't have to have empathy for people when i'm reporting on things or saying what's going to happen. i can tell you if obamacare is taken away and there is not a replacement, donald trump will lose wisconsin. he will lose michigan. he will lose pennsylvania. this will take care of itself. he will lose those states. and guess what? as a republican i can look at the map and i don't have to be emotionally invested and just tell you he ain't going to win wisconsin if he takes away people's health care that they have already accustomed to having. >> you're absolutely right about that. what the conversation says to me having spent the last two years especially around the country talking to folks like a lot of folks, the reality remains the
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same. people want to see themselves reflected in the stories these reporters are writing. and a big part of the animus toward the media is they feel it is lopsided. you only give an east coast or a west coast perspective. you don't have a sense of what it's like in the south and when you do, you think it's the south of the 1950s. that's not modern day south carolina. it's not modern day alabama. so people want to see themselves reflected in the stories written. they don't care if -- what you say and how you say it. they want to see themselves and get it right because their stories are not a part of the american narrative that's being reported by a lot of media today. >> by the way, we have to go to break. i have to say, such great honor to have all of you guys on here for us. >> bob woodward. >> to talk about something this important. >> doris. >> except for sam stein. who we follow on twitter. >> doris, woodward, stein, barnicle -- >> she gave me a bad grade.
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>> he gave me a b. >> he's making it up. he's too smart. >> we have to go. i would hate to not give everybody 20, 30 seconds for final thoughts. mike? >> this is our country. all of us. we all live in it together. we want it to prosper and we want it to be successful and peaceful and everyone to be recognized and have their rights recognized and today donald trump is going to be our president. >> doris? >> i think it's deeper than what we've been saying about the media. people are experiencing changes and globalization and technology in different ways. people in cities and on the coast used to living with immigrants and jobs coming okay to them are feeling one thing about all of the changes in the world. people living in trump land have had a different experience with change. you found that huge gap in the industrial revolution and the problem is one of empathy. we have to understand how people are reacting differently and
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teddy roosevelt said democracy will never work unless he understand the other. we have made other people the other whether it's immigrants on one side or rust belt on the other. the country can't last unless we feel a chance of each other's identity and an empathy of what we're going through together. >> professor kearns is always right. doris is right. this is a big historic change in which you've had a great divide between people who got ahead in the technological globalist trading age and people that felt disaeffe disaffected by it. maybe you didn't knock on my door and listen to it but you're going to when i pull a lever when i vote. this is where it's happening worldwide. it's a bit of a revolt against immigration. we see it from budapest to prague to new castle to newton, iowa, but one of the things that makes america strong is we're
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able to deal with it through a democratic process and, you know, america is strong. we're going to survive. this will be fine. >> might even thrive. you never know. i will say i just think that reporters need to live in the country they cover. it used to be expensive in the age of technology, which obviously we're using technology to send a lot of messages back and forth on twitter and social media, let's use it to get to reporters who are out there in the field living in all 50 states. they're there. >> bob woodward, final thoughts? >> one word. trump quake. that's what this is. it's going to be critically important story and a hell of a story to cover day by day, week by week, the transition and then when he becomes president. he is -- if you could ever get inside his -- all of us will try to understand what he's experiencing now.
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i think there is an element of shock on his part. you could see it in his talk yesterday. >> michael steele and sam stein will be with us for the rest of the show. we'll get sam stein's final thoughts at 9:05. >> bob woodward, walter isaacson, doris kearns goodwin, thank you all. still ahead on "morning joe," donald trump has had his share of bumps and scrapes with top leaders of congress. we'll talk to former majority leader eric cantor and former senator tom coburn about what he can expect to find with his own party. plus -- >> a big choice there. i don't know the right answer to it. there's one tradition in america, right, elections over. we forget about it another tradition in america which is equal justice under the law. it would depend on how bad the violations are and there has not been -- >> you would have to take a fresh look. >> the fbi is still investigating the clinton foundation. >> how will the trump
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administration handle a trump campaign promise? a special prosecutor to examine hillary clinton's e-mail. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. it begins from the second we're born. because, healthier doesn't happen all by itself. it needs to be earned every day. using wellness to keep away illness. and believing a single life can be made better by millions of others. as a health services and innovation company optum powers modern healthcare by connecting every part of it. so while the world keeps searching for healthier we're here to make healthier happen.
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still ahead, eric cantor says no more excuses. it's time for republicans to govern. the former house majority leader joins us to talk about what he says should be the number one focus for republicans going forward. we're back in just a moment.
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>> this is the most incredible political feat i have seen in my lifetime. this is something you have heard me say time and again. 7 out of 10 americans do not like the direction our country is going. many of our fellow citizens feel alienated and have lost faith in our core institutions. they don't feel heard. they don't feel represented by those in office. but donald trump heard a voice out in this country that no one else heard. he connected in ways with people no one else did. he turned politics on its head. now donald trump will lead a unified republican government. >> that was paul ryan speaking yesterday. republicans winning the white house and retaining control of congress means much of the president's legacy is on the line including his signature legislation, the affordable care act. the iran nuclear deal and the paris climate agreement.
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joining us now, former house majority leader eric cantor, senior writer at politico jake sherman and "wall street journal" white house correspondent carol lee. >> let's begin with jake. obviously washington has been shane up. what have you picked up over the past 24 to 36 hours about how trump is going to be working with pelosi and schumer and other democrats? >> i think you bring up an interesting point. i think republicans are beginning to be terrified that donald trump will do deals with pelosi and schumer and i was with paul ryan and his political orbit for the last 48 hours in wisconsin and i think there is some nervousness among conservative republicans that donald trump is going to come to them and say here is a trillion dollar infrastructure plan. i do think there's a big opportunity for donald trump and chuck schumer and paul ryan to do some sort of infrastructure tax package. i think that paul ryan's world sees donald trump in a weird twist of irony. the two men who have been
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warring for the last three months. paul ryan's allies think that donald trump is going to help boost paul ryan and stave off any challenge from the inside of the house republican conference in a leadership election. so very, very interesting times inside of the house republican conference right now. >> eric cantor, what's so fascinating is that both paul ryan and mitch mcconnell are going to have much more authority because they have a president that's not coming in with a thousand aides with a thousand legislative packages that they're going to want to push through congress the first 100 days. >> no question about it. you know, it's a very interesting time in washington to see that there is a chance to make some progress and there are as mika said earlier inned leadup, this is a time for no excuses. our party has won everything now. there are some commitments and
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desires to do things on behalf of republicans and senate that i know have been in place no many, many years. donald trump comes in with this force behind him to shake up this town and to start getting things done. there he is with great expectations. as you heard paul say yesterday, i think that the party is going to be unified behind donald trump. >> carol lee, how do you look at the challenge that republicans face working with their republican president? >> well, i think they've aubl -- there obviously there's been a lot of tension. the thing i look for is republicans have passed a number of proposals during president obama's term that have been rejected and haven't moved and they have someone who actually will sign their proposals. so it will be interesting to see how much actually is moved where there's tension in terms of does donald trump accept what the republicans are sending over to
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him and how do they compromise? do they need to compromise. the initial thing the trump administration is going to do is go through all of the things president obama did and unravel his legacy over the last eight years whether it's executive actions or things like health care. >> so, you know, joe, on what carol was saying, i think he will engage with everybody. he loves that. he will not sign anything republican or democrat policy without getting something out of it. not one thing will be given away. >> i think what makes it so difficult to figure out, mike barnicle, unless he gets something out of it. now, if eric cantor were president of the united states or paul ryan were president of the united states, or you know, i was president of the united states or michael steele was president, you would know what we would want out of it because we have a very defined small
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government view of the world. okay. you want to do health care. i'm getting free market health care drive down costs and give people choice. donald trump, he does not have an ideological foundation. what donald trump wants to get out of it depending on the legislation is anybody's guess. >> let me ask aircraeric cantor that. what happens within the republican party if within the first 100 days your choice is to destroy paris climate accord, rip up the iran accord or try to get some infrastructure spending through house and senate to put people to work. what happens with divisions in your party when it comes to doing something rather than destroying something? >> first of all, i think what has been discussed and i know that leader mcconnell talked maybe even this morning about repealing and replacing
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obamacare. i think joe said earlier there is going to be a test here because certainly the repeal bill is out there. it's the one that president obama vetoed. they could pick that right back up, pass it. what needs to be attached to that is a replace bill. >> you got to have the second part of that formula, don't you, eric, or else you lose wisconsin, you lose michigan, you lose pennsylvania, you lose north carolina. you lose all of these states that trump picked up. >> but to the point that you were saying that the only thing that donald trump has committed to, it goes back to that statement at the republican national convention when he said that the media has been taking trump literally not seriously. people are taking him seriously not literally. he has this very broad commitment to the working people of this country and the states that you mention so if you take something away from them, that's going to be a fall down on his commitment so that is the general commitment that he's
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got. again, having been on the hill for a long time and not having the ability to coalesce behind a replace bill, that's going to be the challenge and as i said before, there's no excuses now. republicans are in charge. >> and i want to talk to michael more about this in a bit. jake, you've been waiting for a long time while we've gone on and on and on over the past hour. it seems to me there's going to be real friction between donald trump and republicans because he -- you have to say i'm not comparing him to teddy roosevelt, he, like teddy roosevelt, likes big things. he's going to like big infrastructure packages. he's going to like big solutions. and he has become a member of a party that thinks just the opposite. small government. small when it comes to taxes. all of these other things. there's going to be that friction there, isn't there?
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>> absolutely. two quick points. i think the repeal bill is going to be a real big issue and on the infrastructure part, we could get into details and squabble over this for an hour. eric cantor and john boehner did a tremendous job in 2009 in holding republicans against an infrastructure spending bill that was the stimulus package. i think they'll see a lot of those members still around. the contours of that package might look the same. you're going to have the same problem. republicans are going to be very skeptical of dumping a trillion dollars into roads and bridges -- >> jake, what i would say, you know what's being discussed is to pay for and tax reform bill. this gives paul ryan and kevin brady and the rest who have been working on these tax reform proposals for years and years the opportunity now to have something to link it up with and that's where i think prospects are to get something done. >> i think the greatest
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challenge for republican leadership will be health care because we have all seen it in our reporting. we've also seen it in our own lives. there are people who now depend on obamacare. just like conservatives warned. once you pass it, it's going to be impossible to repeal it unless you replace it. it's a lot easier to kick down the barn. it takes a carpenter to build it. they're not going to be able to just go in there and repeal it like a lot of their base is going to want them to in the first 60 days. >> that's exactly right. this is something -- that's exactly what the white house has been banking on. they're surprised by this obviously. but have been preparing for getting health care entrenched as possible to make it as difficult as possible to undo. i think you'll probably see some steps in the next two months to further do that. and so it is -- you can't take away people's health care and
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leave them with nothing and then not have something to offer. that's really complicated. the system is really complicated. and i think if you're the president, you're looking at that and hoping that it is too difficult to just totally undo and that some of what he did will have to remain intact. >> thank you so much. michael steele on the other side of this break. we're back with a lot more "morning joe" in just a minute. the long brown path before me leading wherever i choose. the east and the west are mine. the north and the south are mine. all seems beautiful to me. i'm raph. my name is anne.
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we've been talking about the biggest story in the country, maybe the world all morning, but november isn't just about politics. and as it turns out, some people have bigger fish to fry. let's just say, roll tide. >> to be honest with you, i didn't even know yesterday was election day. it was so important to me that i didn't even know it was
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happening. we're focused on other things here. i don't really make political comments. >> that's the thing -- >> roll tide. >> seriously said roll tide. >> by the way, he literally eats the same thing every day because he doesn't want to waste time -- >> he's focused. >> -- figuring out what to eat. >> very focused. >> wants to focus the football season on what he focuses on, which is winning all the time. we have the editor of commentary magazine. >> and the best tweeter i have ever met. >> no doubt about it. so john, you know, i think we wanted to get you on for a lot of different reasons. we're really big fans. also, you have had a certain intellectual hostility toward donald trump throughout the entire process, and yet that never clouded you from doing the sort of things that we're suggesting the media should have done all along, and that is look
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at the situation as it is, not as you want it to be, and say, this guy could win. >> you know, one of the things i'm upset about, and i'm upset about as a commentator and as an american is this garbage i garbage out problem, which is to say from october onward, we were being told by the social science around elections that hillary had a substantial lead and that whatever was happening, including the second comey revelation, that it wasn't -- that trump wasn't really denting it. so you had two different things, which is do you talk about trump on issues and on personal behavior or do you look at this as an election analyst and say, you know, it doesn't really matter what he's doing or what he's saying because she has it in the bag. the thing that we have to deal with now is that all of the ways in which we study and try to bring the news to people about
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the election, all the information that we were handed about this election was wrong. and so one of the ways you could have focused more honorably or seriously about the last three weeks of the election would be to say, if you had this right, it's tied. he may have a slight advantage. what does that mean? what will he do as president? we did not talk about that at all. we talked about "access hollywood." we said when's the next shoe going to drop? we talked about the comey e-mails. but here we are sitting here desperately trying to figure out what will happen, including by the way, you're talking about the repeal of obamacare. right? >> right. >> that conversation didn't take place in october. even though -- >> because no one thought he would win. >> right, but we have all this news about how the premiums were going up wildly all over the country for people who are in the exchanges. and trump is walking around every speech saying he's going to repeal and replace obamacare.
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where are the discussions about what that means? what are the off the shelf things thing s republicans have to go with. >> michael steele, it's so easy to say donald trump is a protoo fascist, a fascist, a zen ophobe. that's really easy to write out. now, a lot of people can't get past that. what they need to start doing is exactly what john is saying. what does donald trump's health care reform plan look like? i will guarantee you, it didn't look like paul ryan's plan or aie's plan. people ignored me for a year and a half. let those who have ears to hear, hear. he's going to see himself like teddy roosevelt saw himself, as a big figure. >> a big deal. >> everything is doing to have to be big from health care to infrastructure, and he just doesn't give a damn. he's not going to care where the
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debt or deficit goes. he wants a big legacy like roosevelt wanted a big legacy. and nobody -- >> a big wall. >> and nobody can get past calling him a fascist to figure that out. >> really, to john's point, it begs the question, how will the press cover the trump administration? because they're going to have to play a little bit of catch-up because they missed those opportunities between october and election day to sort of do the homework and get behind the scene to understand, like you're saying, joe, what is the big piece here? how -- why does he see this as -- >> and how does he close the divide in the republican party? >> you have a president, a republican president, who has a different view on trade, who has a different view about tax code, who has a different view about a lot of the hardwired instruments that the republican party has been using for the last generation. >> and it's going to be more comfortable sitting down and talking to chuck schumer than mitch mcconnell.
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>> he's going to cut the deal, when the house is going to want to go this way and the senate is going to go that way, donald trump going to talk to pelosi and -- >> and he'll cut the deal. >> one of the big issues in this city is this provision for carried interest, something that hedge funds, a special tax break that hedge funds and hedge funders get. and hillary is against it and he's against it. now, if you're a normal convention aal republican, you come into washington. you find a senator and a congressman to write a bill together. they introduce it. there's a discussion. it dies. trump is the kind of person, theoretically, who could call elizabeth warren up on the phone and say, if you introduce a bill to end carried interest on the hedge fund, i'll back it and we'll find a republican in the house. now, i don't know if he can do it with warren. >> yes, he can. here's how the call would go. elizabeth, elizabeth, lizzy, how you doing?
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elizabeth, let's talk. i'm telling you. that phone call will happen. >> i don't know -- okay, so -- >> it will. >> it will. >> here's another part of this. there's the thing you're say, he want to be teddy roosevelt. he would be the third president in a row, maybe the fourth if you want to consider clinton this way, but who comes into office and says, i don't play small ball. i'm swinging for the fences. bush said he didn't play small ball. obama passes four colossal pieces of legislation in 16 months. meanwhile, you know, the standard issue republican party thing is government needs to be smaller. we need to be compassioned. we need to do this. the only president who was like that was george h.w. bush who came into office, said he didn't have a mandate, and he lasted four years. >> really quickly, mike barnicle, another story the press could write when they get past this, we must call him a fascist stage, is the fact he's not beholden to the people on wall street who would kill a
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carried interest bill because he doesn't need their money. he doesn't need 30-second ads. he doesn't need any of that. that is a rev loolution in and itself, when people are finished calling him a fascist, they can write this about how this is going to cause a revolution in washington possibly. >> one of the biggest stories to cover, john would know this, in terms of news and the incoming trump administration is going to be his behavior vis-a-vis everyone else. on the phone, having them down to the white house. hands on, stuff like that. it's going to be fascinating to cover. >> john podhoretz, thank you so much. new york post, take a look at it. it's very good. >> still ahead, 71 days before donald trump takes the oath of office and the transition is well under way. the president-elect has launched his new transition website, and today, he meets with president obama in the oval office. nbc's chris jansing joins us live from the white house, and "time" magazine's michael duffy
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that some people think is forward and others think is moving back. and that's okay. i've lost elections before. joe hasn't. but you know. so i have been -- i've been sort of -- >> you beat me badly.
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>> that's the way politics works sometimes. we try really hard to persuade people that we're right. and then people vote. and then if we lose, we learn from our mistakes. we do some reflection. we lick our wounds. we brush ourselves off. we get back in the arena. we go at it. we try even harder the next time. >> good morning. it's thursday, november 10th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, manager editor of bloomberg politics mark halperin. former democratic congressman harold ford jr. former treasury official and "morning joe" economic analyst steve rattner. veteran columnist and msnbc contributor mark barnacle, and in washington, senior political editor and white house correspondent for the "huffington post," sam stein. sam, your tweets throughout the election were priceless.
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>> mine? >> yes, they were funny. >> i didn't even know you followed me. >> we all follow you, sam. >> who doesn't follow sam stein? >> that makes me feel good. >> i'm glad we could make you feel good. just tell your mother we follow you. the president, hillary clinton, so many people. very gracious yesterday. >> it was beautiful. it was really rough for everybody in the white house, especially, who have been working for so many years on everything they have been building. it was a rough day, and the president really, i think, pushed people forward in the right direction. and also pushed the president-elect in the right direction. >> i think as dramatic of a difference this certainly seems to the media, at least in new york and manhattan and d.c., across the country, there's so many similarities to what's happening today with what's happened when you have the passing of power in the past, where you actually do see everybody actually going from
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showing their worst sides to their best sides. so you had those conversations, those speeches. and then you had donald trump calling chuck schumer. chuck schumer saying, putting a good positive statement out. nancy pelosi doing the same thing. them coming together as americans. i think there is a reason why the dow jones hit an all-time high yesterday. >> did you see that? >> it's because actually as much as we denigrate leaders in washington, d.c. and politicians, yesterday, democrats and republicans seemed to act together in concert in the best interest of this country. >> i thought the markets were supposed to collapse. >> yeah, they were. we'll talk to steve rattner about that. let's get on to the news. >> okay, president obama will be meeting with president-elect trump in the oval office later this morning to discuss the future of the country, as well as potential policies that could be cried over. the predent has ordered that trump, vice president elect mike pence and designated members of
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their team receive access to the president's daily briefing. the intelligence assessment with the nation's most highly guarded secrets. meanwhile, first lady michelle obama will greet melania trump for their first meeting as the white house changes hands. and vice president joe biden called governor pence yesterday morning and invited him to the naval observatory for dinner. what do you make of those meetings? what's your gut, mark halperin? how's that going to go? >> we had an abnormal presidential campaign, and this period, the last 48 hours, is exactly the way it always works. and it's extraordinary, the meeting today, president obama greeting the guy who was the leader of the birther movement, a guy who questioned his legitimacy as president and the president yesterday, and i suspect today, is being gracious and hopeful for the country. >> it goes the other way, too, obviously. donald trump saying all of these things about barack obama, barack obama spending the last
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month -- >> savaging. >> savaging him, saying he's unqualified to be president of the united states. i'm sure he said it because he believed it. but this reminds me so much, harold ford, of that book "the preside presidents' club" that talks about michael duffy, we had him on the show a lot to talk about it, where you have people killing each other on the campaign and when it's over, they come together. not happy about it, but they come together. and then two years later, they realize they're in a club, and there's only like two or three people in the world who know what they're going through. like george h.w. bush and bill clinton. like barack obama having very gracious things to say about george w. bush yesterday. they realize they're in this very small club, and they lean on each other. >> part of what helps bind them in addition to what you and mark have said, it's great for the country to see the tradition, this part of the campaign and this part of the presidential transition happening as it should, is they all get that
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presidential security briefing. and when that happens, not only are you a member of that club, but you're the most important member of the club at the moment because you're expected to lead. we'll watch this play out. look, it was fascinating on one level, particularly to talk to friends of mine who don't follow politics and know and love it and sort of live it like we do, who were surprised that this could happen the way it is, and that obama and vice president biden -- >> you know, bill clinton. i think you have seen donald trump together. again, i had somebody shocked at what was going -- and i said, oh, bill clinton and donald trump are going to be playing golf within two years. and they went, no. i said, it's going to happen. because they have no choice. as barack obama said, this is an intramural battle. we're on the same team. we've got to be in the same boat together. it's going to happen. >> it was reassuring, again, just from pelosi to schumer,
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across the board, and even this morning, as you watched mika mention and steve will touch on it how the markets reacted, which was a surprise for many people, at least for some people. and even world leaders. i know yesterday, when richard was on, he talked about his advice for the president and who he would call and the reassurances he would give, and to see president-elect trump is doing that, demonstrations last night across the country, beutto watch this aspect of the transition happening is reassuring. >> and steve, the markets, what happened? >> the markets went up for a variety of reasons. some of it is a post-election sort of relief, a peaceful transition of power. the markets hate uncertainty. but a good bit of it was the fact that people started to look at what donald trump is saying he's going to do, and that's substantial tax cuts, which will -- in the short run, create economic growth, and a good bit of spending, particularly on infrastructure.
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if you look at the stocks in the heavy equipment business, like caterpillar, they went up a lot. banks went up a lot because interest rates went up, which is good for banks and also because donald trump said he's going to dismantle dodd/frank, and that's something the banking companies want. >> mike barnicle, again, if you're just looking at this idealogically out there, you're going to expect, especially after such a heated campaign, you're going to expect that nothing gets done, but the fact is, nancy pelosi immediately said along with chuck schumer and others, hey, i think we can work on an infrastructure bill together. donald trump also talking about infrastructure. and nancy pelosi said, as president-elect trump indicated, investing in infrastructure is an important priority of his. i had somebody saying, oh, now the republicans want to do infrastructure because now there's a republican as
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president. that's somebody who doesn't understand. donald trump has been a democrat his entire life. donald trump is not going to fight for the things that i fought for. which is entitlement reform, balanced budget. he wants to be a big -- >> maybe some of them. >> i'm just saying, he wants to be a big prede. he's not going to be sitting there looking at decimal points and how the budget is going to balance 25 years from now. yes, there are going to be a lot of things where he and pelosi are going to have more in common than, say, he and pat toomey. >> well, first of all, joe, the country was owed what happened yesterday. this peaceful transition, the acknowledgments from president obama, speaker pelosi, donald trump, in the eve and early morning hours speaking more humanly. and more soberly about the job that he is about to take over. i don't think in history we could look at history and never see a time when a peaceful
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transition was more necessary. and needed to be spoken about publicly by the people involved in it. with regard to his potential program, with regard to cutting regulations and steve just alluded to the stock market having a fairly healthy day. a very healthy day. i can't recall -- we always talk about the first 100 days of an administration. i can't recall a time in the last 40 to 50 years of presidencies in the first 100 days is going to be more instrumental in setting the course for a presidency than donald trump's first 100 days because he has, first of all, for the first time in history, he has mitch mcconnell actually smiling and meaning it. he has the republicans in control of the house and the republicans in control of the white house. >> you always have, mike, something i know this will be a shock to editors at the "new york times," but it shouldn't be. you'll actually have donald trump, a republican president,
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talking to a minority leader in chuck schumer and a democratic minority leader nancy pelosi, who understand each other culturally. i know that will shock a lot of people, but they have been around each other for years. donald trump has, i think, given checks to both of them. >> has that ever happened? a president has given to the minority leaders before? >> no, you had somebody a democrat their entire life and decides three years before he runs to be republican. what i have always noticed is there's such a cultural divide between, let's say, democrats from new york and california and republicans negotiating from middle america. you're just not going to have that this time. again, i know a lot of ideologues don't want to hear this and it's going to upset a lot of conservative republicans, a lot of liberal democrats, but you're going to have -- it wasn't hard for donald trump to call chuck schumer yesterday or
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nancy pelosi because he knows them. he's known them a long time, krinlted to them, and just maybe washington may work more effectively than in the past. >> i am going to say that and it might be too soon. you get the sense of these two americas when you walk around our world and you see -- everybody is crying and so upset, and it's the end of their world. i have never seen this more than in this past election result. having said that, we do know donald trump. and what he does love is interacting, friction with, drama with, engaging with, joy with people. he's not afraid of people. he wants to talk to people all day long. it's what he does. and this is going to be unlike anything we have ever seen, and i think decades. and definitely in the past administration where i feel that there was a lack of interest in
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socializing and connecting with people after hours. i think that president obama had a different approach that way. and hillary clinton had a big wall of protection around her. there was no access to her. i think this is going to be the politically most accessible president we have ever seen. >> also, anybody who knows how george w. bush ran his administration, he had republicans two years in complaining they had never been to the white house to meet him before. >> you're not going to have this problem. >> george w. bush, the same way, he wanted to work, wanted to go upstairs and watch espn. this will be far different. we have lot to talk about. first, we have to get to the most moving sound from yesterday. hillary clinton's remarkable speech. >> here she is speaking to her supporters and tearful aides about the loss. >> last night, i congratulated donald trump and offered to work with him on behalf of our country. i hope that he will be a successful president for all
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americans. this is not the outcome we wanted or we worked so hard for. and i'm sorry that we did not win this election for the values we share and the vision we hold for our country. i know how disappointed you feel because i feel it, too. and so do tens of millions of americans who invested their hopes and dreams in this effort. this is painful. and it will be for a long time. we have seen that our nation is more deeply divided than we thought. but i still believe in america and i always will. and if you do, then we must accept this result and then look to the future. donald trump is going to be our president. we owe him an open mind and the chance to lead. our constitutional democracy
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enshrines the peaceful transfer of power, and we don't just respect that. we cherish it. it also enshrines other things. the rule of law, the principle that we are all equal in rights and dignity, freedom of worship and expression. we respect and cherish these values too, and we must defend them. and to the young people in particular, i hope you will hear this. i've had successes and i have had setbacks. this loss hurts, but please never stop believing that fighting for what's right is worth it. and to all of the women, i want you to know that nothing has made me prouder than to be your champion. and to all of the little girls who are watching this, never
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doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world to pursue and achieve your own dreams. >> mika, in a day of extraordinary moments, i have to say, moments that moved me and surprised me more than any in at least a decade, i can't think of a day where i just kept looking at the television saying, i can't believe this story unfolded the way it did. certainly, i can't think of another news story that surprised me this much politically. >> we're surprised, too. the entire campaign. >> that was the most remarkable moment, i think, of all the remarkable moments we saw yesterday. hillary clinton once again doing what she does best. coming back and showing unprecedented perseverance. >> it was beautiful.
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steve rattner. >> i was going to say, i have known her for 20 years, as i suspect other people at the table have. she is a formidable woman. she's of extraordinary ambition, and i say that in a positive way. that makes this kind offend a moment even harder to take. it was so unexpected. i had been around her supporters the last 48 hours and the devastation is calculable. it's one thing to lose. it's another thing to until 9:00 at night think you're going to win. this is an example of her incredible self-discipline, her incredible commitment to public service, and her incredible desire to end this on a high note. >> harold ford, we have come to expect people like hillary clinton and al gore and george h.w. bush to show extraordinary grace in defeat. but there's no guarantee that that's going to happen. what hillary clinton did yesterday, i put up there with
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the other two people i named. again, just an extraordinary selflessness, putting country ahead of party and ahead of personal ambition. it was really moving and extraordinary what she did. >> it was an astonishing resilience she showed yesterday. you have to have thought, as both of you said, 12 hours, 18 hours before, she thought this would be a very different outcome, especially 24 hours before. and to take on all of the pain and the grief, to steve's point, the incalculable unbelievable feeling in the room, she took it all on and projected back to everyone, if you believe in what we fought for, what i fought for throughout my public life, now is not the time to give up. to hold herself with her husband, her daughter, her son-in-law standing there, and all of us watching, many of us who invested so much in her
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personally into the campaign was a stunning moment. i congratulate her and thank her for the service for 40 years in public life and hope it's not the end of it. a different chapter and a different way to contribute, but it was remarkable. >> still ahead on "morning joe," jd vance, who understands the undercurrent in the election perhaps better than anyone joins us. >> and tom coburn joins us live from the swing state of oklahoma where donald trump won by 36 points. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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he wears his army he hat, walks aroundpliments. with his army shirt looking all nice. and then people just say, "thank you for serving our country" and i'm like, that's my dad. male vo: no one deserves a warmer welcome home. that's why we're hiring 10,000 members of the military community. i'm very proud of him. male vo: welcome to new beginnings. comcast. the good news is based on this pattern of me being wrong on every one of my donald trump predictions, he's probably going to be a great [ bleep ] president. i felt a lot of emotions last
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night and into today. some sadness, some anger, some fear. but i'm also aware that those are the same emotions a lot of trump supporters felt. emotions that led them to make their choice, and it would be wrong for me to think my emotions are somehow more authentic than their emotions. we're always better as a society when we have empathy for one another, so i would just say, i would like to say to those trump voters congratulations. i sincerely hope he addresses your concerns. i sinsa sirely hope if you felt forgott forgotten, he won't forget you now. >> that's nice. >> there's a guy, there's a guy -- >> wow. >> -- who is a good democrat from new hampshire. he believes it. that's what america needs to do. there's some late night hosts that lost it. i have to say, i grew up, i never once -- you know, all these people who say, oh, i want to be johnny carson. never once in our little house in meridian, mississippi, when i
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was in third grade did i think johnny carson was mocking me. or mocking my family or ridic e ridiculing the way we live. it just seeps out of the pores of some of these people. but it didn't with seth meyers and god bless seth meyers. he was raised right to believe that other people who don't think just like him actually have his valuable feelings as they do. >> an interesting day at 1600 pennsylvania avenue, that is for sure. donald trump will be there, of course, and president obama will also welcome the nba champion cleveland cavaliers to go to the white house, and cleveland's own chris jansing made sure she will be there to cover it. >> of course, she did. >> very smart. >> lucky her. >> we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ ♪
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coming up on "morning joe" -- are. >> i have instructed my team to follow the example that president bush's team celt eight years ago and work as hard as we can to make sure that this is a successful transition for the president-elect. because we are now all rooting for his success. in uniting and leading the country. the peaceful transition of power is one of the hallmarks of our democracy. and over the next few months, we're going to show that to the world. >> chris jansing joins us live from the white house ahead of president obama's historic
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would you want to be chief of staff? would you want to be attorney general? >> that's a pregnant pause. >> you really don't think i'm answering any of these questions, do you? you know me better than. the answer is i'm not committed to doing anything in a new administration or not. you know, the bottom line is i have a job to do to help get the administration ready. if there's some role for me that i want to do and that the president-elect wants me to do, we have known each other for 14 years. we'll talk about it. >> that was chris christie on the "today" show this morning. he's heading the trump administration transition team. bloomberg politics reports that senator jeff sessions of alabama is interested in defense, while congressman michael mccaul of texas currently the chair of
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homeland security committee, is also a contender to lead that federal department job. senator bob corker of tennessee and former ba ee eer ambassador bolton are weighed for secretary of state. outside trump tower, retired lieutenant general michael flynn told nbc news i see myself helping donald trump and the government and the country succeed, and former new york city mayor rudy giuliani who is off at donald trump's side on the campaign trail is considered the favorite for attorney general. chris jansing live from the white house as the 44th president and the 45th president-elect meet. >> but she's not there for that. >> she's not there for that. we know why she's there. >> we busted her. >> she's so bad. i wonder who she knocked out of that slot to get there today. >> why don't you tell america why you're at the white house today. nothing to do with the historic
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meeting between the 44th and 45th president? >> did you know, i'm not sure you're aware of this, you're not a sports fan, but the cleveland cavaliers are reigning world champions. >> somebody told me that. >> that's not why i'm here. i'm here because lebron james, a supporter of hillary clinton, that was an important political angle that i needed to be here for. >> no, not really. >> i might be in the room because i think that is important. >> yeah, and let me ask, are the indians getting the -- are the indians meeting the president as well today. >> at the white house? >> that is so cruel. i'm still -- it's been a while, but i'm still on a little edge. >> too soon. alex told me to ask you that. i thought it was heartless. so we can get past the pain and agony of what happened in cleveland, why don't we talk politics? tell us, mika and i saw some pictures of the white house, it
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looked like they were in mourning yesterday. the president was speaking. talk about the shockwaves that donald trump's victory has sent through the white house. >> it's indescribable. i have been here for, you know, several years now. and spent a lot of time with the staff. i walked in yesterday, and it was like a wake. i mean, for them, something here died. and there were hopes and dreams and expectations. you talked a lot about that today. nobody saw this coming. and they have about a nanosecond to get past that and move on to the business at hand. the business at hand starts today with the meeting between the president and president-elect. there's been a lot going on behind the scenes. the president had at the beginning of the year set up various groups that are going to make the transition as seamless as possible. there are agency heads who have been involved in this in every single agency, but symbolically, i don't know that there's anything more important, whether it's for the people who work in
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this building or the people across america, the two groups of people, for example, that i saw walking home from dinner last night here in washington who were protesting the election of trump, including a group outside of his new hotel here in the old post office. for them, seeing this after the words that we heard over the last 36 hours from both him and hillary clinton is a visual affirmation of what we call the peaceful transition of power. i think josh earnest put it very bluntly yesterday. he said this isn't going to be easy, but the president also explained why it has to be done. here's what he said. >> now, it is no secret that the president-elect and i have some pretty significant differences. but remember, eight years ago, president bush and i had some pretty significant differences. but president bush's team could not have been more professional or more gracious in making sure we had a smooth transition so that we could hit the ground
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running. and one thing you realize quickly in this job is that the presidency and the vice presidency is bigger than any of us. >> we will see very briefly on video part of that meeting. what we won't see is the meeting in the east wing between the first lady and melania trump. she's going to show you around. i just want to say that i remember talking to laura bush. she said one of the key things was getting them information about how do you deal with having a child in the white house. so there may be some bonding there. joe and mika. >> all right, thank you so much, chris jansing. let's bring in somebody who has written extensively about the rare company donald trump now enters. the manager editor for "time" magazine and the co-author of the book "the presidents' club." i love your book and i love it because it explains something i was trying to tell somebody in the obama administration about eight years ago, when they knew everything and they had cracked the code.
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i said, do you not think the bush administration, the people that walked through these gates eight years ago didn't think the same thing as you? so to explain to americans why barack obama is doing this today gracefully and why barack obama and george w. bush are now very charitable towards each other. i read something from your book. presidents typically land in office thinking they know better than their predecessors. having spent the entire world that that's the case, they believe it themselves, then something like a chain reaction occurs. they win the office, then the office strikes back. challenging a president, chastening, confronting him with all he doesn't know. this is what i was explaining to a friend yesterday when they were in shock and disbelief. bill clinton and donald trump will be golfing together again within the next year. and barack obama and donald trump will be talking to each other because as you explain, it's a lonely position, and
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nobody in their entire universe knows what it's like to be president except the people in the presidents' club. >> right, and it's absolutely true, joe, and in the great 64-year-old tradition of the outgoing president having the incoming president over to the white house, it usually starts exactly the way it is starting today, with people who don't agree on anything, have fought against each other, don't particularly like each other, but at a moment like this, on new members' day, the president who's leaving the office has an opportunity to say to the person coming in, you have no idea about the burdens you're about to shoulder, and i'm ability ou get rid of. let me say one thing. there are so many opportunities to mess it up and millions of people's lives, millions of lives are at stake. i'm going to do everything i can to help you get it right and not make the mistakes that are inevitable, but that assistance has gone back since truman hands
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it off to eisenhower, because he came into office with no preparation and says i will do everything i can to make sure that what happened to me does not happen to you. >> and that's what i wanted to get into with you. everybody thinks, again, this is the first time something like this has happened in such a dramatic way. no. your book details it in great detail. truman, trying to help ike, despite the fact they had really hard feeling for each other. ike was almost contemptuous of truman. truman felt like like stabbed him in the back. truman tried to help him out. and then ike hands it off to jfk, and he's contemptuous of this kid who he thinks is not serious enough for the job he just held. >> the same animosity was between johnson and nixon. johnson had nixon in twice during the transition. the cabinets have dinner, there staffs have dinner. it's in that meeting between
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johnson and nixon right before the inauguration in 1969 that johnson says to nixon, you know, you ought to have the taping system ripped out. it's the worst decision i ever made. >> oh, my gosh. >> you know how that story ends. these are private moments of very, very intimate advice. they usually involve -- truman handed ike three binders about foreign policy. who knows if ike even read them. both sides really, particularly the outgoing side, try to lend a hand because they alone, that person usually knows unlike anyone else, just what the other guy is stepping into. and there's no preparation for it, even if you have spent your life in politics. of course, donald trump is a relative newcomer to that. >> total. the same kind of animosity, i challenge it, but you can push back. this is a little different, isn't it? i mean, trump, the whole birther thing between he and obama. i think that stuff cuts pretty
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deep. and let alone, how personal this election has gotten. >> except for the fact that harry truman, we could go back. we can go through each one of them. richard nixon -- >> that bad? >> maybe it didn't play out, michael steele, as publicly, on twitter, on tv, but in the small communities they lived in, it was every bit as personal. >> okay. >> in fact, i would say this animosity is a bit more surface and shallow than the animosity that truman had for ike or ike had for jfk or lbj had for nixon. or the bushes had for this draft dodging pot-smoking serial adulterer bill clinton. but they all felt had no right to be in office, yet ask the bushes now, bill clinton is a member of their family. >> there are those person things that sort of draws them together and apart, and the policy
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things. you go back to some of these battles. that's what it's about. the question i have for michael, though, is in that -- does the office itself change that relationship? so when trump gets in there and he's settled into the office as the president, do the other presidents now look at him differently? and see him differently than they did six weeks ago or yesterday? >> oh, yeah. just because of the fact he won. you know, this is the strangest club in the world, mike. you know, the people in the club don't get to choose who's in it. the voters choose. they have to deal with the consequences. but they all have respect for the people who have done it, who have been elected because they know how hard it is, as president obama was saying yesterday, to actually make the case and get people to vote for you. they also know that the situation and circumstances change year to year and what looks right in 2004 or 1996 has really no bearing on what's going on today.
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so they recognize especially as president-elect trump gets his first full national security briefing which will be a big aha moment and it's always a kick in the teeth. they always learn things about what's going on in the world they didn't know when they were campaigning. that's something the former presidents know as well. it's a new world for everyone. >> "time" magazine's michael duffy, thank you very much. >> thank you, michael. still ahead this hour, author jd vance writes in the "new york times," quote, the decline in certain corners of the country isn't just about economics. it's about every ement of life, from family, to life expectancy to drugs that have infected our communities. jd has been unlocking the mysteries to donald trump's appeal and now win for the presidency and he joins us ahead. keep it here on "morning joe." than your health. or the freedom to choose what doctor you want to see. so if you're on medicare, consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan,
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all right. joining the conversation, we have former republican senator tom coburn of oklahoma. chair of the american conservative union, matt schlapp. msnbc contributor to the new york daily news, mike lupica, anand giridharadas, and former marine yale law school graduate and author of the "new york times" best seller "hillbilly elegy" jd vance. sam is still here, too. >> how fantastic. we'll have to get to you after we get to everybody else.
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joking. jd, everybody talking about the missing america. you have the editor of the "new york times" now saying they, very belatedly, need to understand the type of people that you write about in "hillbilly elegy." >> i think that's definitely true. one of the things that became clear as the election results poured in is trump had this solid floor that wasn't going away. even though a lot of polls shows clinton ahead, there was this core group of voters where if turnout was low enough, they were going to be high enough to make trump the president. >> of course, anand, there was, i think nate kohn has looked, and politics is so fascinating, also looking at the very people who helped elect barack obama eight years ago were the people who switched and voted for donald trump. helped make him president. >> i think the challenge for us right now, and we talked a lot about -- you talked a lot about today the challenge for media and people talking to the american people going forward. we have to be able to understand
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two different and opposing thoughts. i think we need to do a much better job of understanding the why of this vote for trump. and going into the heartland, understanding the kind of concerns you have so eloquently surfaced. understanding that why. >> right. >> but i think we also have to understand that what the what of this vote. what people voted for. the statements that endorsed as a result of the vote were outside -- >> let me staep you right there. you're making the jump right there. >> let me make the jump. >> you're making the jump that really i would, if i could say it on the air, i would. i would say that screwed up editors and their judgment all along. >> let me answer. >> i can answer the what. the why, because of economic reasons -- >> let me make the jump. >> people think that you're endorsing racist comments. people vote their economic self-intere self-interest. >> let me make the jump. the why is some mix of distress.
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i talked about it as a feeling of being mocked by the future, and that's economic, that's a lot of different things. >> let me ask you, we're friends. how do you know that? >> i have talked to a lot of people. >> have you gone out to western pennsylvania and talked to meme? >> yes, around this country. >> they feel mocked about the future? as somebody who ran four times. it's not that complicated. by the way, my kids out of my situation. >> let me just finish my point. i think we have to do a radically better job of understanding the why of this vote and i think we failed. but i think the people who voted for this didn't get a choice to make donald trump's statements. they just got to vote yes or no on those statements. >> right, binary choice. >> what they had to endorse in order to satisfy their feelings included a number of things that are outside the constitutional -- >> again, i'm doing your a favor. when you say to satisfy their feelings, it's about getting
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their kids out of the communities and having a better life than them. they're not just satisfying their feelings. >> joe, i concede that. all i'm saying is in order to do that, yes, in order to do that, they ended up endorsing a bunch of things that are outside the normal american constitutional order. >> true, agreed. >> that was my jump. and so, those of us going forward are going to need to do a better job of empathy for them but our burden also is to not normalize this quickly and to be vigilant. our role of very carefully watching this society and the risk of authoritarianism, even if it's a small risk, is important and i think we're rushing too quickly to say the people have spoken. this is it. what has been endorsed included very dangerous elements. >> we have a lot of people talking, but i would only suggest that somebody that wants to be an authoritarian or a
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fascist or a crypto nazi, all the stupid terms that have been thrown out there, do not call nancy pelosi and chuck schumer and say we have to work together and get legislation passed. let's go, matt schlapp, why don't we admit it now? i have taken on the left. let's take on our side. we have been blind over the past 30 years to the suffering of people that sometimes voted for us, against their own self-interest. we have been blind to people hurting in wisconsin. we have been blind to people hurting in michigan. we republican s and small government conservatives, we come forward with aei solutions to everything because that's where we come from idealogically. and we missed something bigger. these people that feel abandoned by the "new york times" and the left, they felt abandoned by the right, the left, republicans, democrats, the weekly standard, the national review, the "new
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york times," you name it. >> yeah, i think we need to check our math. we talk a lot about free markets, and we talk a lot about how a free economy will create jobs and help people. but a lot of times the policies that end up coming out of that hurt people. i would like to go back and say, okay, how does this affect the regular joy, i shouldn't say joe, the regular person. >> nothing regular about me, my man. to my detriment. >> the fact also is we have dominated people. i know trump as a billionaire is an exception to this, but we have nominated people since ronald reagan who i think had a little trouble saying they could relate to the average person. i think ronald reagan got this because he grew up in a hard scrabble way, and donald trump is this anomaly, the rich billionaire guy who seems to connect to these people. i'm excited we're doing that and excited at results in states like wisconsin, pennsylvania, and michigan. we clearly connected to that person you described. >> it wasn't a coincidence that ronald reagan graduated from
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eureka college and struggled for some time. mike lupica writes this in the new york daily news. for voters, trump represented change and clinton looked like more of the same. quote, he wasn't them, he wasn't her, he wasn't clinton. now against all odds he's the 45th president of the united states. say the polls didn't matter. he didn't. he said to believe him, not them and not her. she was going to win in florida. she didn't. he told everybody michigan was in play, it was. so was pennsylvania. there isn't a candidate in all of american political history who could have survived saying the things trump said about women, immigrants, refugees, judges, john mccain, and vladimir putin. not enough people cared. he wasn't washington. he wasn't them and wasn't her. it turned out the whole system wasn't rigged after all, which actually speaks to some of the things i have said. >> an analyst said to me a couple weeks ago, i keep looking for the hidden trump vote and i can't find it. it turned out it was hiding in plain sight. in that same column, i wrote
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that this was the mad as hell moment from the movie network. everybody opened their windows and screamed from all pockets of this country that they were mad as hell. you know what we found out? maybe this country isn't just a kardashian world. maybe people don't care about that stuff as much as we think they do. and those people spoke the other night. >> yeah, they did. tom coburn, we got into '94, there were some republicans that were conservatives, but also a bit more populist than most republicans in the house right now or the senate. how does trump work with a republican congress that he may not agree with idealogically on several points? >> well, i don't think he'll have trouble doing it because he's a deal maker. he knows how to negotiate, and he knows how to give you something of what you want for him to get something he wants. so i don't think that's going to the big problem.
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the big problem is going to be even if you have trump there, can you limit the scope and jurisdiction of the federal government that impacts everybody's lives in a negative way every day. government is supposed to be about impacting you positively. the big question about this election, people were coming out because the government hadn't done what they should do and is doing things they shouldn't do, and they had it. opening the window and screaming is what you got. you had a real coalition of different interested folks. i asked nate silver three or four weeks ago at a conference about the people who wouldn't tell him the truth about voting for trump. and he said, oh, it wasn't a factor. what was a factor is a lot of people voted for trump who told the pollsters that they weren't voting for trump. and it was because there's this mixed emotion about president-elect trump. some of his coarseness i don't like, but some of his policies i love so i'm not going to bean
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pole. i had a dinner last night, and almost everybody there with the except of a few people voted for trump. most of them didn't want to tell anybody they were voting for trump. >> still don't. sam stein, do you have a question for jd, sam? >> i do, actually. i want to look into the future a little bit because one of the critiques about what's about to happen is trump has made a host of promises about revitalizing this part of america that's witnessed decades long decline, and i think people rightly note that a law of that decline is not necessarily correlated with politics. what happen in the next year, two years, three years, if trump doesn't turn around their economic and social plight. how do they react? >> first, it's important to note that a lot of people don't expect trump to fix everybody. i hear a lot, trump isn't our savior, but at least he listens to us and respects these concerns. i think there will be a reckoning over the next few years where people realize that these problems still largely exist. and i think that as a community,
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my sort of white working class community is going to have to get comfortable with the fact that progress is probably slowly things getting better over the next few decades. it's not in three years everything reverses. >> we had way too many guests this morning. we love every one of them, but especially we need you to come back tomorrow so we can have a long conversation on this. it's an important conversation to make. and i think we agree a lot more than we disagree. it's just we have to figure out a way to do it. can you come back tomorrow? >> absolutely. >> by the way, i'll be quiet because you heard there's nothing regular about me. >> we're all recovering from a lot of passion. >> i apologize. mike lupica, can you come in tomorrow as well? >> sure. >> we have a lot more to dissect. we can't do it when sam stein is here because i get so nervous. >> that does it for us this morning. stephanie ruhle picks up the coverage right now. >> recovering from passion. we

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